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Indonesia

An Nurumi Mosque

An Indonesian mosque styled after St. Basil's Cathedral. 

An Nurumi Mosque goes by many names and is recognized all around Yogyakarta. Some call it the “Candy Mosque,” because of its colorful domed spires that resemble lollipops. However, it is best known as the Mosque of the Kremlin.

Inspired by St. Basil’s Cathedral, which many people confuse with the Kremlin, the small mosque is similar to its cousin to the Northwest, but just a shade off. Like the misnomer in calling it the Mosque of the Kremlin, An Nurumi Mosque seems like a replica with a little less pizzaz than St. Basil’s. It is much smaller, and doesn’t even come close to the prominence of Russia’s Cathedral, centered on Red Square. In fact, a well-trafficked street allows cars to zoom past the place of worship with little reverence.

Despite its drawbacks, An Nurumi is beautiful in its own right, and its off-shade light blues and pinks give the Mosque an Indonesian flair that it flaunts over the competition in Moscow.

Know Before You Go

If you come to Yogyakarta and planning to visit Prambanan Temple after visiting the Sultan Palace in the city centre, you will go pass by this mosque in your journey through Jalan Raya Solo (Solo Great Street, a big inter-city road connecting Yogyakarta and neighbouring tourism city, Surakarta/ Solo). There are a few rather famous restaurants nearby such as famous Kalasan-style fried chicken restaurants and cook-your-catch seafood restaurants.If you plan to use public transport to visit this place from the Sultan Palace, Malioboro, or Tugu Jogja, it will be easier to use Transjogja Route 1A and stop at Kalasan (14 minute-walk) or Prambanan Temple (30 minute-walk). Other alternative to people more accustomed to Yogyakartan minibus sistem ("angkot") is to use Yogyakarta-Prambanan hail-and-ride minibus from Gadjah Mada University campus. Hailing motorbike taxi can also be an alternative.

Contributed by
serflac
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