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A Freak Storm Created a Bunch of Rare Waterfalls on Australia’s Uluru

It doesn’t rain much there.

Uluru at dusk.
Uluru at dusk. Stuart Edwards

Uluru, in Australia, is one of the wonders of the world: a massive rock in the middle of pretty much nowhere that is sacred to indigenous peoples and very hot all of the time.

It also doesn’t rain very much, but this week, it did, making for some impromptu, and very beautiful, waterfalls. Here’s a video of some of them: 

And here is another video of more waterfalls: 

How scarce is rain there? Normally, the rock only averages about 11 inches a year—but this year, according to Sky News, it saw nine inches of rain on Christmas night alone, which officials said was a once-in-50-years weather event. 

And while it’s too late for you to catch this in person, you should visit, as nearly a half million people do every year—to take pictures, and, occasionally, remove their clothes

Update: This story originally encouraged potential visitors of Uluru to climb the rock. While it’s not illegal to do so, it is against the wishes of local indigenous people due to the area’s spiritual significance.

Every day, we track down a fleeting wonder—something amazing that’s only happening right now. Have a tip for us? Tell us about it! Send your temporary miracles to cara@atlasobscura.com.