Win a Trip to Experience Iceland's Hot Springs in the Winter - Atlas Obscura

Win a Trip to Experience Iceland’s Hot Springs in the Winter

Learn firsthand why the country is often called the “land of fire and ice.”

The Blue Lagoon is one of Iceland most-popular attractions.
The Blue Lagoon is one of Iceland most-popular attractions. Jeff Sheldon

Traveling during winter to Iceland may seem counterintuitive. But one dip in the country’s famed thermal pools and it’s clear why this Nordic country is one of the warmest winter destinations to visit. The country’s unique spa and bath culture, experienced against a backdrop of snow and ice, is like nothing else on Earth.

Public bathing is core to Icelandic culture, dating back to its original settlement, and remains integral today. These days, locals value their geothermal pools not only for their health benefits, but also for the natural energy they provide their country.

Experience the healing waters of Iceland for yourself on a trip courtesy of Iceland Naturally. Visit the Blue Lagoon geothermal spa in addition to dozens of other communal pools worth exploring. Consider Krauma, renowned for its year-round perfect temperatures, the Vök Baths, where a series of floating pools are situated in the lake, or the Kvika Foot Bath: a miniature pool and art installation located right in Reykjavik.

Iceland Naturally is sending 20 people to enjoy:

  • Round trip airfare on Icelandair
  • Accommodations for three nights at Hotel Nordica
  • Reykjavik City Cards granting access to Iceland’s thermal pools, museums, public transit, and various retail discounts
  • A basket of gifts from leading Icelandic brands, including Icelandic Glacial Water, Brennivin, Reyka Vodka and Icelandic Provisions
  • An expenses-paid visit to the Blue Lagoon geothermal spa

For more details, rules, and to enter the sweepstakes, click here.

You have until August 30, 2019 to enter. Good luck, and safe travels!

Experience the healing waters of Iceland for yourself on a trip courtesy of Iceland Naturally, the leading source on all things Icelandic. Click here to enter.