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Fruits & Vegetables

Olosapo

In Central America, custard grows on trees.

The olosapo is a bit like what would happen if sweet eggs hatched from a tree. This Central American fruit is rarely sold commercially. The best way to find it is by foraging in its native habitat.

The flavor of a ripe olosapo is like a refined egg custard: sweet, egg-like, and sometimes with a touch of sharp cheese. Some fans liken the flavor of the dense, fibrous pulp to butterscotch. Foragers most commonly eat the fruit out of hand, but you can also blend it into smoothies, ice cream, or milkshakes. It can also make a handy egg substitute in sweet recipes, such as an egg-free “eggnog.”

Unripe fruit is green and extremely astringent, so be sure to wait until the skin turns bright yellow, with lumpy pockmarked skin, and yields to light pressure. When in doubt, the best way to tell that it’s ready to eat is to wait until one falls to the ground and hope that you get to it before any animals do.

Need to Know

The olosapo is not typically sold commercially, but if you’re traveling through its native range—particularly from Southern Mexico to Costa Rica—keep an eye open for the fruits growing in the wild or in someone’s yard.

Where to Try It
Contributed by
Jared Rydelek
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