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Winchester, England

Winchester Round Table

A medieval replica of King Arthur's legendary table, the Round Table hanging in Winchester Castle was decorated by Henry VIII. 

Though it has been proven to be an imitation of the legendary table around which King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table congregated, this table hanging in the Great Hall of Winchester Castle itself dates back to late medieval times.

Constructed from English oak dates in the later years of the 13th century, the round tabletop hangs in the Great Hall of Winchester Castle, built under Henry III. Considered one of the finest surviving aisled halls of the 13th century, the Great Hall is all that remains of the medieval castle originally constructed for William the Conqueror in 1067.

The round table is believed to have been made in about 1290, for a “Round Table” tournament (festival) near Winchester held to celebrate the betrothal of one of Edward I’s daughters.

The tabletop measures 5.5 meters in diameter and weighs 1,200 kg. Though originally a table standing on legs, it has been displayed hanging on the west wall since 1873, when it was moved from the east wall where it had hung prior to that time (since at least 1540, and possibly since 1348).

The artwork you see on the table today dates to the reign of Henry VIII who had the table painted with the Tudor Rose at its center. The outer design is thought to portray Henry as King Arthur on his throne, surrounded by 24 places, each bearing the name of one of the legendary Knights of the Round Table.