horticulturcat's User Profile - Atlas Obscura
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Places visited in Wilmington, Delaware
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Places added to Lewes, Delaware
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Washington, D.C.

Capital Transit Co. Streetcar Barn

Before Metro, Washington had a robust streetcar network—and you see the remains of this infrastructure if you know where to look.
Washington, D.C.

United Brick Corporation Ruins

Once the supplier for noteworthy projects like the National Cathedral, this old brickworks now lies abandoned.
Washington, D.C.

Watergate Steps

Decades before the scandal, this staircase on the river was a literal "water gate."
Washington, D.C.

The Exorcist Stairs

Site of the climactic scene from The Exorcist.
Washington, D.C.

National Archives Vault

An atomic bomb-proof strongbox protects the U.S. Constitution from terrorists and thieves.
Washington, D.C.

Dumbarton Oaks

The Byzantine, pre-Columbian, and medieval art at this stately mansion are some of the most under-appreciated collections in D.C.
Washington, D.C.

House of the Temple

This imposing Masonic temple a mile from the White House was the first public library in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.

Holodomor Memorial

An easily overlooked memorial to a Ukrainian famine-genocide that killed over 4 million people.
Washington, D.C.

Site of the Union Station Train Crash

A 1,100-ton train fell through the floor in 1953. Workers got it patched up in just 72 hours.
Washington, D.C.

Memorial to Japanese-American Patriotism in World War II

An unassuming, powerful monument north of the U.S. Capitol bears witness to the resilience of Japanese Americans during a time of grave injustice.
Washington, D.C.

Owney the Postal Dog

The traveling postal dog covered 48 states and more than 140,000 miles in his lifetime, and lives on as taxidermy patched up with a rabbits foot and a pigs ear.
Washington, D.C.

Carousel on the National Mall

Washington's iconic carousel has a nice piece of Civil Rights history.
Washington, D.C.

National Capitol Columns

The United States Capitol's former columns still stand.
Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania

Jim Thorpe Monument

An Olympic hero controversially stripped of his medals is buried in a town he never visited, that took his name after his death.
Amherst, Massachusetts

Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Founded by the famed children's book artist, this museum spreads an appreciation of the arts through picture books.
Springfield, Massachusetts

Dr. Seuss Sculpture Garden

Life-size bronzes of the Grinch, Cat in the Hat, Yertle the Turtle, Sam-I-Am, and the Lorax—and the author himself.
Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Johnstown Flood Museum

Memorializing an American tragedy of massive proportions.
Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Johnstown Inclined Plane

Steepest flood safety railway in the entire world.
Harpers Ferry, West Virginia

John Brown's Fort

The last holdout of a pre-Civil War rebel who took the matter of slavery into his own hands.
Washington, D.C.

Peacock Room

This stunning blue and gold room changed cities twice before becoming part of the Smithsonian.
Dover, Delaware

Miles the Monster

The Dover International Speedway is home to a towering, concrete-skinned, racecar-hungry behemoth.
Kensington, Maryland

Washington, D.C. Mormon Temple

The tallest Mormon temple in the world soars above the Beltway.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Elfreth's Alley

This charming colonial alleyway is one of the oldest continuously used residential streets in the U.S.
Washington, D.C.

Knife Edge

Architecture lovers won’t stop touching the National Gallery's 19.5 degree marble prow.