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Leominster, Massachusetts

Birthplace of Johnny Appleseed

The proud home town of an American legend has honored the birth of their favorite sun with what seems to be a gravestone 

Even though the image of a man walking around Colonial America wearing a pot for a hat and planting apple orchards seems like something that could only be a folktale, there was in fact a real life Johnny Appleseed, who may have been America’s first conservationist, and his birthplace is now ironically honored by a gravestone.

Born John Chapman on September 26, 1774 in Leominster, Massachusetts. At the age of 18, John and his brother headed West, and while they did not just randomly plant apple trees as they wandered about, they did create a number of fenced orchards. Pear or apple orchards were required by law to uphold land claims in many settlements, which made his nurseries very popular places to settle. He also would return to tend to his nurseries every 2 years or so. At the time of his death, Chapman owned around 1200 acres of land. He was also a noted conservationist and vegetarian.

Leominster, Massachusetts is very proud of their native son. There you’ll find the Johnny Appleseed Visitors Center, Johnny Appleseed Elementary School, Johnny Appleseed Arts & Culture Festival, Johnny Appleseed 5k, etc. but most directly, on Johnny Appleseed Lane, you’ll mind a marker (which looks remarkably like a gravestone) for the birthplace of Johnny Appleseed. Besides the simple stone marker, there is a small log cabin roughly the size of a large dollhouse. 

Know Before You Go

If you are coming from the main road it will be on your left. It is easy to miss. There is no parking, but it is a quiet road and you can pull off on the side of the woods pretty easily to see the site.

If you go to the back of the cabin you can look in. Behind some Plexiglas is a diorama. 

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