Hudson-Meng Bison Kill – Harrison, Nebraska - Atlas Obscura
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Harrison, Nebraska

Hudson-Meng Bison Kill

A rancher expanding a natural spring for his cattle came up with bones – lots and lots of them. 

Sometimes you just want to dig a hole, and you end up making a monumental discovery, such as with the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill, which was found when a rancher was just trying to dig a pond.

In 1954, Nebraska cattleman Albert Meng was expanding a historic spring to provide water for his cattle in the Oglala National Grasslands when he found bones – lots and lots of them. Seriously disconcerting amounts of bones. It was this sprawling grim find that led to archaeologists unearthing the 10,000-year-old remains of up to 600 bison.

Afer telling his friend, and local amature archeologist and former mayor of Chadron, Bill Hudson about the bones, Mr. Hudson brought the find to the attention of Dr. Larry Agenbroad -who found and developed the nearby Hot Springs Mammoth Site-, from nearby Chadron State College after 20 years of trying to bring the site to someone’s attention.  Preliminary digs started in 1968 followed by more extensive excavations in 1971.

Hudson and Meng are credited with discovering what has become known as the largest cache of Alberta Culture bison ever found. The excavation in 1971 initially found stone tools and the site was deemed a Native American kill site.   Similar fascinating sites of mass bison death in North America – such as the Vore Buffalo Jump, a natural sinkhole used to send over 20,000 buffalo plummeting to their ends –have been found throughout the western US.  However a series of smaller digs in the 1990s presented findings that these bison died of unknown natural causes, rather than being a “kill” and butchering site implied by its given name.

Regardless, the name of the site has stuck. It is also named after the rancher who discovered it and the amature archeologist who called attention to it and continues to be touted by the National Parks Service as an example of the ways everyday people can make hugely important contributions to scientific discovery and progress – even if by accident.

 

Know Before You Go

From Hot Springs, SD
Take Highway 71 south to the intersection of FS Rd. #904 (37 miles). Continue on FS Rd. #904 to Sand Creek Rd (15 miles). Turn right on Sand Creek Rd. (FS Rd. #905) and continue 6.3 miles to Hudson-Meng.

From Crawford, NE
Crawford to the intersection of Highway 20 and Highway 2. Go north on Highway 2 and FS Rd #904 (4.2 miles). Turn left on FS Rd #904 to Sand Creek Rd (7.4 miles). Turn left on Sand Creek Rd.(FS Rd. #905) and continue 6.3 miles to Hudson-Meng.

From Chadron, NE
From Chadron, take Highway 20 east to Crawford (23 miles). At the intersection of Highway 20 and Highway 2, turn right/north on Highway 2 and FS Rd #904 (4.2 miles). Turn left on FS Rd #904 to Sand Creek Rd (7.4 miles). Turn left on Sand Creek Rd.(FS Rd. #905) and continue 6.3 miles to Hudson-Meng.

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