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Trøllanes, Faroe Islands

Kallur Lighthouse

The isolated structure beckons adventurers with sublime views of the Faroe Islands. 

The scenery surrounding the simple lighthouse at Kallur is dramatic: Craggy cliffs clad in layers of green grass spike toward a sky so blue it seems to merge with the sea. Wind-whipped clouds billow above while waves lash the land below. On a wet, stormy day (and there are many of those), stray wisps of sunlight mingle with the mist to create the occasional rainbow.

The rustic, red and white lighthouse tops the northern tip of the island of Kalsoy. The isolated structure helps guide ships around the cluster of lands that crops up from the Atlantic Ocean to form the Faroe Islands. The picturesque scene around the lighthouse invites visitors to bask in the island’s beauty. 

Reaching this sublime spot requires a bit of effort, however. Visitors must follow an unmarked trail through stretches of vivid, verdant fields. Expect to encounter sheep along the way, and keep an eye out for their stone shelters—they’re a sign you’re on the right path.

Though the island and its signature lighthouse are remote, they’re worth the trek. In addition to offering gorgeous views, the northern parts of Kalsoy are also an important birding area. The cliffs are a critical breeding place for seabirds like Atlantic puffins, European storm petrels, and black guillemots.

The island of Kalsoy is sparsely populated. Only around 100 people call it home. A network of roads and tunnels connects the four settlements that are scattered around the flute-shaped landmass.