St. Mary Redcliffe Tram Rail - Atlas Obscura

St. Mary Redcliffe Tram Rail

World War II air raids over Bristol dislodged this fragment of tram line that ended up embedded in a churchyard.  

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During the Bristol Blitz of 1940, a bomb exploded in a nearby street and threw a piece of tram rail over the houses into the St Mary Redcliffe churchyard, where it sank into the ground. The rail was left as a memorial.

The plaque in the churchyard explaining how this impressive monument escaped a dramatic ending sreads: “ON GOOD FRIDAY 11TH APRIL 1942 THIS TRAMLINE WAS THROWN OVER THE ADJOINING HOUSES BY A HIGH EXPLOSIVE BOMB WHICH FELL ON REDCLIFFE HILL. IT IS LEFT TO REMIND US HOW NARROWLY THE CHURCH ESCAPED DESTRUCTION IN THE WAR 1939-45”.

The Bristol Blitz took place during World War II. A series of air raids resulted in significant damage to the infrastructure, including the city center and industrial areas. The consequences were devastating: there were numerous deaths, the destruction of homes, and the displacement of thousands.

Despite the hardships, the resilience of Bristol’s citizens led to post-war rebuilding efforts and contributed to the city’s recovery and eventual restoration of its economic and social fabric.

Know Before You Go

To see the piece of tram rail, take a walk through the churchyard towards Colston Parade, it is right next to the fence that surrounds the garden.

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