15 Glorious Hangover 'Cures' From Around the World - Gastro Obscura
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15 Glorious Hangover ‘Cures’ From Around the World

Atlas Obscura readers share their tried-and-true favorites.

Hungry Dudes/CC BY 2.0

Happy New Year, dear readers! The penultimate year of the decade is upon us, and for many, 2019 will start with a customary hangover. Luckily, we recently asked Atlas Obscura readers to tell us about the greatest hangover foods they’ve encountered on their travels, and we received a whole slew of potential remedies from across the globe.

Before you wake to a rough morning, check out some of our favorite submissions below. While we can’t guarantee that any of these “cures” will work, why not start the new year off right by trying something new? The only thing you have to lose is that pounding headache.

mariko/CC BY 2.0

The Brine of Canned Dill Pickles

How did you discover it?

“Studying in Poland, my flatmates recommended it to me.”

Does it work?

“Rather not. It serves more as a test of courage than a cure.” — Alexandra, Switzerland

Earl Grey Tea and a Slice of Buttered, Toasted Baguette With Jam

How did you discover it?

“In France, you can’t have a cheese tasting party without wine, and after so many glasses, my French boyfriend and I clung to each other for dear life as we stumbled home. I woke up with the spins, and he made this for breakfast. I felt so much more balanced after this, and have relied on it since.”

Does it work?

“Yes!” — Lindsay Fortier, Madison, Wisconsin

Menudo (Mexican Hangover Soup Made with Tripe)

How did you discover it?

“[I learned of it] when I lived in California.”

Does it work?

“Absolutely if you can ‘stomach’ it. Haha!” — Patrick Berger, Durham, North Carolina

Rasol (Cabbage Brine)

How did you discover it?

“It’s a widely known folk hangover ‘medicine’ in the Balkans.”

Does it work?

“Absolutely.” — Natasha, New Orleans, Louisiana


JIRCAS Library/CC BY 2.0

King Coconut Water

How did you discover it?

“As told by the elders…”

Does it work?

“Yes of course!” — Achala, Sri Lanka

Anything With a Sour Taste

How did you discover it?

“I usually go with apple or orange juice. I find that the taste in my mouth the next day bothers me far more than the headache, and when I drink orange or apple juice I can’t taste it for a while.”

Does it work?

“Yes, for me.” — Bas D., The Netherlands

Bacon, Egg, and Cheese on a Roll

How did you discover it?

“Most popular order at the local deli on the weekends.”

Does it work?

“Always makes me feel better.” — Douglas Rooney, New York City, New York

Salt and Vinegar Potato Chips/Crisps

How did you discover it?

“It’s actually my remedy for seasickness, but it also works for hangovers.”

Does it work?

“Yes. Plus I get to eat chips. Win:Win.” — Katherine Rose, Cape Town, South Africa

alljengi/CC BY-SA 2.0

Irn Bru and a Greasy Breakfast

How did you discover it?

“[It’s a] traditional Scottish remedy.”

Does it work?

“Definitely. There’s a reason why Scotland is the only country in the world where Coca-Cola isn’t the best selling soft drink.” — Phil R., Edinburgh, Scotland

Club Soda With Bitters and Fresh-Squeezed Lime Juice

How did you discover it?

“As a bartender in Texas decades ago.”

Does it work?

“I’m a non-drinker, but it seemed to work for my customers. The secret is not to wait until the morning after, but to consume it before leaving the bar.” — Lis, Crescent City, California

Miso Soup With Kimchi and Ginger

How did you discover it?

“Broth sounds good when hungover. While eating sushi out, I saw the health benefits of miso displayed on the table, so I tried it the next time I was hungover.”

Does it work?

“Ginger soothes the stomach. Electrolytes and sodium replenish your body’s system. And the kimchi has probiotics. It’s the best breakfast after a hangover. You can even add a soft-boiled egg if you can motivate yourself to cook the egg while hungover.” — Sarah, West Virginia

Barbacoa

How did you discover it?

“A nice, big, spicy, hot, acid consommé made of the lamb cooked overnight, and tacos of barbacoa, made of stomach lamb and spices. It’s sold in the tianguis (road markets), and you can see others victims of a hangover asking for their own cure.”

Does it work?

“Sure! Even if you only have a long night without sleeping, it wakes you up.” — Juan Alcantara, Mexico City

Graham Crumb/CC BY-SA 2.0

Tinned Pickled Mackerel

How did you discover it?

“[I discovered it after] years of experimentation.”

Does it work?

“Yes, if you eat them before you go to bed!” — Marco, Siegen, Germany

Ito En Oi Ocha Unsweetened Dark Green Tea

How did you discover it?

“[I learned this from] years of practice in Japan.”

Does it work?

“I do [think so]. As we know, it’s all about hydration. The high, but gentle release of caffeine and the potent antioxidants found in green tea don’t hurt as well.” — Prem Joshi, Los Angeles, California

Chocolate Milk and Sauerkraut

How did you discover it?

“Purely, and obviously, by accident.”

Does it work?

“Oh yes, it calms down the stomach immediately and rehydrates.” — Cookie F., Wyoming

If you have an amazing hangover cure of your own to share, head over to our community forums and tell us about it!

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