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Washington, D.C.

Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Vega

The "lovely red Vega" of the legendary record-settling pilot.
38.8879, -77.0200
Washington, D.C.

Owney the Postal Dog

The traveling postal dog covered 48 states and more than 140,000 miles in his lifetime, and lives on as taxidermy patched up with a rabbits foot and a pigs ear.
38.8981, -77.0082
Renwick 17th street side
Washington, D.C.

Renwick Gallery

The first purpose-built art gallery in the United States is once again open as a center of craft arts.
38.8990, -77.0391
Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop
Fredericksburg, Virginia

Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop

This war hero's old shop remembers the fine line between medicine and quackery during the Revolutionary War.
38.3041, -77.4599
The statue at the Smithsonian.
Washington, D.C.

Bare-Chested George Washington

Perhaps the most scandalous statue of America's first president.
38.8913, -77.0299
Senate side.
Washington, D.C.

Capitol Bollards

The 5.5-mile ring of steel posts around the Capitol Building is one of the largest (and most uniform) of its kind in the world.
38.8898, -77.0060
The Traveling Man
Dallas, Texas

The Traveling Man

A trio of colossal statues spread across a Dallas neighborhood chart the emergence of a giant robot born of a locomotive and spilled gin.
32.7858, -96.7885
Women's Museum, Fair Park.
Dallas, Texas

Texas Centennial Art Deco Buildings

A "Texanic" (gigantic Texas) collection of Art Deco architecture at Dallas' historic Fair Park.
32.7794, -96.7612
Aerial view of a "safety flared" intersection
Arlington, Virginia

George Washington Memorial Parkway

This isn't your average roadway—it's actually a National Park and a transportation pioneer.
38.8438, -77.0491
Perimeter of the garden
Arlington, Virginia

The Graves of Robert E. Lee's Garden

Soldiers were buried next to Lee's house in the center of Arlington Cemetery to dissuade the general from reclaiming his property after the war.
38.8811, -77.0726
View from second story.
Washington, D.C.

Chinatown Barnes Dance

The unique traffic pattern named for an influential urban planner is also known as the Pedestrian Scramble.
38.8997, -77.0221
Central sculpture in front of wall bearing internment camp names
Washington, D.C.

Memorial to Japanese-American Patriotism in World War II

An unassuming, powerful monument north of the U.S. Capitol bears witness to the resilience of Japanese Americans during a time of grave injustice.
38.8946, -77.0106
Outside the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. (ncindc/Flickr)
Washington, D.C.

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Largest Roman Catholic church in North America.
38.9335, -77.0007
You'll never unsee it now.
Washington, D.C.

Washington Monument Marble Stripe

Look closely and you’ll notice that the color changes a third of the way up the tower.
38.8903, -77.0332
Cher Ami in the Smithsonian
Washington, D.C.

Cher Ami

A heroic pigeon that, through a barrage of gunfire, delivered a message that saved over 100 lives in World War I.
38.8912, -77.0303
The Rosslyn Metro escalator. (Steven Cohen/Atlas Obscura)
Arlington, Virginia

Rosslyn Metro Escalator

At 207 feet, one of the world's longest continuous escalators.
38.8959, -77.0715
Sergeant Stubby at the Smithsonian
Washington, D.C.

Sergeant Stubby

The most decorated dog of WWI is preserved in the Smithsonian for his heroism.
38.8913, -77.0296
Summerhouse, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted - United States Capitol grounds, Washington, DC
Washington, D.C.


A hidden gem on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted.
38.8914, -77.0106
One the many bathrooms in the Mansion.
Washington, D.C.

The Mansion on O Street

With over 100 jam packed rooms to explore and elaborate tea services and events, the Mansion on O is a hidden treasure.
38.9084, -77.0457
North American collection
Washington, D.C.

National Bonsai Museum

One of the dwarven trees dates back to 1625 and survived the Hiroshima bombing.
38.9120, -76.9687
Brickyard structures
Washington, D.C.

United Brick Corporation Ruins

Once the supplier for noteworthy projects like the National Cathedral, this old brickworks now lies abandoned.
38.9167, -76.9673
Washington, D.C.

National Capitol Columns

The United States Capitol's former columns still stand.
38.9104, -76.9676
The Hecht Company Warehouse saw prosperous days throughout the 1950s. (Library of Congress)
Washington, D.C.

Hecht Company Warehouse

Art deco landmark on the outskirts of Washington, D.C.
38.9150, -76.9839
National Building Museum
Washington, D.C.

National Building Museum

Fittingly, America's museum of architecture is itself a magnificently designed old building.
38.8978, -77.0175