Police Might Have Solved Baffling Case of Phenomenally Accurate Egger - Atlas Obscura
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Police Might Have Solved Baffling Case of Phenomenally Accurate Egger

It took months of stakeouts, surveillance, and eggshell forensics.

An egg, cracked... just like this case (maybe).

An egg, cracked… just like this case (maybe). (Photo: John Liu/CC BY 2.0)

After months of stakeouts and eggshell forensics, police may have finally figured out who egged a Cleveland-area home over 100 times in one year, WDRB reports.

Between May 2014 and June 2015, the egger managed what local news outlets called a “continuous onslaught” against the Clemens household, a green, two-story home in Euclid, Ohio. After dark, he would drive up to the house, launch five or six eggs, and then speed off again. Each attack lasted about ten minutes and sounded, the family said, like gunfire. “The accuracy is phenomenal,” Albert Clemens, Sr. told cleveland.com last year. “They almost invariably hit the front door.”

Police investigated the baffling case for two years, sending officers immediately whenever Clemens called in a new incident. They installed surveillance cameras on the house, held undercover stakeouts, and canvassed the neighborhood for clues. Detectives asked local restaurants whether they were missing eggs, and sent shell bits for testing at a crime lab. At one point, the entire community policing unit was dedicated to the cause.

But such interest just made the perpetrator boil over. “An officer last year was taking a report when a barrage of eggs was launched at the house,” cleveland.com relates. “One hit him in the foot.”

Last week, WDRB reports, police finally arrested the alleged egger—Jason E. Kozan, Clemens’s former neighbor. Kozan, who denied his involvement, was indicted yesterday. But even if he did do it, his motivation remains opaque.

As Lieutenant Mitch Houser said last year, “somebody is deeply, deeply angry at somebody in that household for some reason.”

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