There Are a Lot of Quirky Henges Around the United States - Atlas Obscura Lists

There Are a Lot of Quirky Henges Around the United States

Here are 15 that may not be ancient but are plenty wondrous.

Okay, one henge certainly stands of above all the others, but there are many variations on the henge—the catch-all for Neolithic ring-shaped earthworks—across the British Isles and beyond. Before Stonehenge, the comedian Eddie Izzard once quipped, there was woodhenge and strawhenge (at least until a big, bad wolf blew them down.)

The dirty truth about henges is that they can be made out of anything—in the past there were stones, mounds, and wood, but modern henges aren’t bound by those old strictures. The henges of the United States are an eclectic collection of original sculptures arranged in rings, as well as modern replicas of the more ancient varieties. And a few of them are of the historic sort. It’s up to you, dear reader, to tell the difference. (Hint: The oldest ones tend to be made of stone, not plastic horses.)

Alliance, Nebraska

Carhenge

An experimental, automotive replica of Stonehenge.
Sponsored by Nissan